About your Search

20110714
20110714
STATION
KNTV (NBC) 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KGO (ABC) 1
MSNBC 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
WMAR (ABC) 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the same pakistan-based group that attacked mumbai in 2008. this time, mumbai was better prepared, but the violence would inflame tension between two old enemies, india and pakistan, both nuclear powers. richard engel, nbc news, cairo. >>> and here in our new york studios our chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. andr andrea, i don't need to tell you, this is your line of work. you ask any u.s. official what keeps you up at night, and they answer, these two countries, nuclear nations, and especially pakistan. >> pakistan is about to pass france as the fifth greatest nuclear power in the world and they're on a hair trigger. there's no hot line between india and pakistan, only last week, diplomats from both countries meeting out at stanford university trying to talk about establishing a hotline. so unlike the cold war, there is no communication, they could have an accident. this time india has said in the past that they were restrained three years ago when it was proved that pakistan was behind the attack, they were restrained by the u.s., by the rest of the world, th
in afghanistan, iraq and pakistan. while there is no immediate claim of responsibility, the u.s. officials say a handful of networks including an indian terrorist group may be behind the bombing. a senator with an intelligence background says the indian mujahadeen who want them to dominate the indian way of life is suspect. but they say the group is poorly organize and possibly had outside help, possibly from pakistani intelligence. >> with a dramatic attack like this, coordinated over three locations, it took money and it took planning. that always raises the speckor of the isi in pakistan. >> the three explosions at the mumbai opera house, jewelry district and major commuter hub drew comparisons to the mumbai attack in 2008. the ram pain that lasted for 60 hours killing 166 people was low-tech. it relied on ten pakistani militants armed with cell phone, handguns and back packs filled with explosives. the group l.e.t. linked to pakistani intelligence was blamed. >> the obvious question: is pakistan involved? i cannot think of any conceivable reason why pakistan would want to provoke a crisis
that the gradually improving relations between pakistan and india are not given a dent from this attack? >> i think the indian government is being very cautious. i think they are not speculating and i think so it would be very early for me to speculate on why they decided to be very open-minded about this investigation. of course the 2008 attacks on mumbai, the indian government did accuse pakistan of having some involvement in this those attacks. the 2006 train bombings in the city happened in the rush hour, more than a dozen indian nationals arrested for that. it is very easy to -- there has been a lot of speculation and jumping to conclusions about the possibility of pakistan's involvement but the indian government is keeping an open mind. pakistan governments condemned the attacks shortly after they happened yesterday. indian opposition parties are pointing a finger in that direction but i think it is very early to draw any speculation about who might be behind this attack, particularly because they say they are still working on very limited intelligence. >> thank you very much indeed. the chin
. i guess, if it is not homegrown, it would be from the usual area that is pakistan. >> is that believed, that the authorities will be taking? if so, what will that do for relations between india and pakistan? >> there will be tension, but the indian government, like the rest of the world, is aware that tourism has increased quite sharply in the last few years in pakistan. they are, in fact, more of a victim of terrorism than we are. i think it will try to talk it out and tried to put in place methods by which -- and try to put in place methods by which they stop this terror. >> you say changing their methods. didn't we hear that in november of 2008? the authorities bolstered intelligence gathering and security after those attacks and this happened. doesn't this expose the weaknesses and vulnerabilities? >> it does not seem the nature of terrorism has changed. instead of sophisticated explosives, there improvised explosives, i.e.d.'s. these are used in various parts of india and used abroad. in afghanistan, for example. >> professor, thank you very much for talking t
people and 100 wounded. this is the biggest attack since the 2008 attacks blamed on pakistan based militants. they say one glass was at a bus stop in the crowded neighborhood. the others were at the jewelry markets, a very business the district. >> the bombs exploded at the height of the evening rush hour. within the space of 10 minutes, they ripped through three busy district. won a famous jewelry market that draws crowds of shoppers. it is believed that the perpetrators planted the explosives on scooters and motorcycles. one of the bombs was hidden inside of a car. >> about 6:45 p.m., within minutes of each other. this was a coordinated attack by terrorists. >> there was an immediate claim of responsibility. they believed the bombs were improvised devices. so far, they have refused to blame any groups. at the united nations, the german foreign minister expressed his shock. >> i condemn these horrible acts of terror. our condolences are with the families and with their friends. of the victims. the perpetrators must be brought to justice. >> bomb by has repeatedly been a terrorist
that occurred originally back in the '40s between india and pakistan, a couple hundred muslims live inside -- >> millions. that's okay. >> live inside india and there are extremist groups with india as opposed to pakistani base that go over to india responsible for similar small-scale attacks. so nobody is clear yet who it is, but i think you're right. the fact that indian officials didn't immediately blame or cast doubt that it was pakistan suggests that they don't think it is. >> and also you just made a point we were talking ak. 200 million muslims in country of india makes india one of the largest -- the largest muslim country in the world? >> exactly. indonesia and india, countries with the largest number of muslims in the world. indians often present that evidence to westerners. >> sure. >> saying we know how to work closely with our multiple populations. we're a large democracy and see how things go so well. it doesn't always go so well in that country. >> move to syria. both in new york and washington we're obsess with the debt talks and defaulting and obviously for important reaso
is the ringleader in a scheme to illegally export paint to pakistan. that paint is allegedly used in construction of a pakistan nuclear plant. many experts fear that plant will produce plutonium. 51-year-old was arrested at an atlanta airport last month. the uc-santa cruz grad charged with violating u.s. export laws and conspiracy in connection with the paint purchase by the chip ease government. the felony charges, carry a maximum penalty of 65 years in prison and $1 million in fines. >>> he loved to fish and loved the 49ers. friends and family gathered in san francisco today to remember, one of the victims of last woke's boating accident in mexico. this follows the news that the coast guard is calling off the search for survivors of the accident. nbc bay area's reporter shows us how loved ones are remembering the only official casualty. >> reporter: it was a scene, leslie ye wouldn't have cared for much. friends and family gathering at a san francisco church to talk about his life. >> my gnats doesn't like publicity, humble. he wouldn't like this big commotion about him. >> there was plenty to
the speckter of the isi in pakistan. >> this morning, new evidence suggests the bombs were planted at a bus shelter, also on a motorcycle and near a parked car. this really shows that these devices were designed to cause maximum casualties and they all went off within a span of 15 minutes, and again, the simultaneous nature of the attacks is a signature of terrorism, heather. heather: they did their jobs. catherine, what does this attack mean for the u.s.? >> well, look, immediately in washington, the focus went back to three years ago and these attacks in mumbai, that was a series of attacks orchestrated by ten pakistani militants armed with cell phones, hand guns and backpacks with explosives. analysts here say if this latest attack causes friction between india and pakistan that could be serious trouble for the u.s. let's listen: >> if the attack were a cause to try to provoke a crisis between india and pakistan that would have major implications for the united states. we do not want to see those two countries go into another crisis and perhaps fight another war, which they've done three
were killed in 60 hours of terror. blamed on militants based in pakistan. these latest bombs have been describe as relatively crude and possibly the work of local militants. whoever's behind them, they've shown that india's largest city is still vulnerable. caroline hawley, bbc news. >>> the president and congressional negotiators return to the debt negotiations table today after yesterday's meeting ended in confrontation. those in the meeting said that president obama announced enough is enough, we have to be willing to compromise, before walking out of the room. the moody's rating service is threatening to downgrade the nation's credit rating because of this crisis. >> both sides really locking horns. >>> new light is being shed on the problem of american kids and obesity. and two harvard doctors are weighing in. >> what they're saying about overweight children has just about everybody taking sides on this. abc's lana zach explans the controversy. >> reporter: thanks, peggy and daniel. it's really a radical idea and it's intended to get people talking about childhood obesity. in "the
that are being persecuted in countries like pakistan. and we -- >> on of your business? that's interesting. investigation continues tomorrow night. what are we going to see tomorrow? >> reporter: tomorrow how he makes a business out of his expertise. how these donation toss his cause end up with a so-called foundation owned by his business partner. and also the bigger question, anderson, why are our taxpayers going to pay this guy? he can say whatever he wants, but where are the people vetting these so-called terrorism experts that are suddenly making a lot of money in this country? >> that's interesting. drew, fascinating. we'll continue to follow up. we'll have that report part two tomorrow. >>> coming up, you may not have been following the war in libya recently. but tonight you are going to get as close to the come bass as anyone can. our ben wedeman and his crew caught in the crossfire today. and the video of it is heart-stopping. >> guys? alec? as fast as we can. we can't tell who the -- >> going to show you the full video what happened. we'll talk to ben. he was able to get out, his
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)